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  • Implicit Bias and Health Disparities in the Era of COVID-19 with Guy Seymour

Implicit Bias and Health Disparities in the Era of COVID-19 with Guy Seymour

  • Saturday, October 03, 2020
  • 10:00 AM - 5:30 PM
  • Zoom

Registration


Registration is closed

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity and Culture 

Implicit Bias and Health Disparities in the Era of COVID-19:

Implications for Policing, Health Care and Psychotherapy

Guy O. Seymour, Ph.D. ,

Psychologist and Policing consultant

Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020, 10:00 AM - 5:45 PM

 (with 1 hour lunch break)

Via Zoom

CE/CME continuing education

5.75 credit hours, diversity or cultural competence credits

Fees

Non member $120

Current WSP Member $90

Current WSP Student $50

Program

This program will address health disparities as they have emerged in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the simultaneous emergence of disparate outcomes of policing in racial and ethnic minority communities in the United States.

As has been unavoidably present in recent months, this is a moment of national and international reflection on the roles, activities and assumptions of police agencies and the communities in which they are embedded. This program places the issues confronting policing in the context of the history of America and the legacies of racism, white supremacy and white privilege. Implicit Bias associations makes avoiding racist behavior in policing extremely difficult, and more so when officers are under stress. The pandemic of racism complicates any efforts to bring personal biases under control but certain strategies will be discussed.

All registrants will be asked to take the Implicit Associations Test prior to the beginning of the conference, and will have opportunities to self-evaluate their results during the conference. The need for community collaboration in the face of this health pandemic, and the long-standing pandemic of racism and its roots in slavery and Jim Crow will be addressed. Racial vulnerabilities in encounters with police will be discussed. Historical and cultural factors and their implications for implicit bias in psychotherapy will be explored. Psychotherapists will be assisted in learning more about their biases and what to do to counter their influence. Participants in this conference will be able to identify their hidden or automatic biases, formulate "work arounds" to mitigate the behavioral impact of their biases, and distinguish between implicit associations and conscious bias.

Implicit Bias is bias that results from the tendency to process information based on unconscious associations and feelings even when these are contrary to one’s conscious or declared beliefs. The Implicit Association Test measures the strength of associations between concepts (e.g. black people, gay people) and evaluations (e.g. good, bad) or stereotypes (e.g. athletic, clumsy). The main idea is that making a response is easier when closely related items share the same response key. It is important to know that implicit bias does not mean that a person is prejudiced. Many people use the word ‘prejudice’ to describe people who report negative attitudes toward social groups. By this definition, most people who show an unconscious or implicit preference for one group over another are not prejudiced. The IAT shows biases that are not necessarily endorsed and which may be even contradictory to what one consciously believes. 

Health disparities are seen when, compared to whites, members of racial and ethnic minorities are less likely to receive preventive health services and often receive lower-quality care. They have worse health outcomes for certain conditions. To combat these disparities health care professionals must explicitly acknowledge that race and racism factor into health care. 

COVID-19 has exposed the racial dimension in health care. People of color are by far the most likely to have COVID-related illnesses that lead to hospitalization, and the vast majority of COVID deaths in the USA and in the UK are of people of color. 

Presenter

    Guy O. Seymour, Ph.D. (Boston University, 1972), B.S. La Universidad Interamericana de Puerto Rico, Recinto San German (1966). He is currently Licensed in Massachusetts (#537) and Georgia (#984) as a Professional Psychologist. A native of British Guiana (now Guyana), educated in Puerto Rico and Boston, he was the Founding Director of the Minority Training Program (now the Center for Multicultural Training in Psychology at Boston Medical Center) and Chief Psychologist at the Boston City Hospital. He relocated to Atlanta, Georgia in 1981 to work on the case of the Missing and Murdered Children (The Atlanta Child Murders) and to conduct evaluations of the Mariel Cuban Refugees at the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary for the National Institute of Mental Health. He psychologically debriefed all the correctional staff of the penitentiary who were taken hostage in 1987 by the Mariel inmates. While working as the Chief Psychologist for the City of Atlanta Department of Public Safety he established the Employee Assistance Program of the City serving all elements of City Government and employee family members and was the Designated Substance Abuse Professional for the Department of Transportation in Atlanta City Government. As Chief Police Psychologist he established a prototypic Early Identification Program for Police Misconduct including monitored referrals for psychotherapeutic evaluations and treatment. From 1985 to 2003 he was also the clinical and trauma response psychologist assigned to the Atlanta Field Division and Central and South American offices of a federal agency with worldwide scope of activities. From 1990 to 1995 he was Principal Investigator of the Center of Excellence at Morris Brown College directing the Laboratory for Investigation of Police Use of Deadly Force under Conditions of Stress. In 1996 he was Co-Director of the Crisis Response Team for the Centennial Olympic Games and coordinator of the mental health response to the Atlanta Olympic Park Bombing. In 2001 he was one of the Red Cross crisis response team members for the World Trade Center terrorist disaster. He has been the Consulting Psychologist for more than thirty police and fire departments in Massachusetts and Georgia until his automobile accident which rendered him a paraplegic in 2013. He has maintained his psychology licenses current to date and he has been working to provide ethical and authentic clinical psychological services and community policing consultation. 

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to describe mechanisms for identifying hidden or automatic biases.

Participants will be able to formulate “work arounds” to mitigate the behavioral impact of their biases.

Participants will be able to list at least two tools for reducing disparities in their work.

Participants will be able to articulate differences between implicit associations and conscious bias.

 Participants will be able to discuss the roots of pandemic racism in slavery and Jim Crow.

Participants will be able to discuss racial vulnerabilities in encounters with police.

Accreditation

Participants should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The Washington School of Psychiatry is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Washington School of Psychiatry maintains responsibility for this program and its contents.

The Washington School of Psychiatry is authorized by the Board of Social Work Examiners in Maryland to sponsor social work continuing education learning activities and maintains full responsibility for this program. This training qualifies for Category I continuing education units.

The Washington School of Psychiatry has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6388. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Washington School of Psychiatry is solely responsible for all aspects of the program.

The Washington School of Psychiatry is accredited by MedChi, The Maryland State Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The School designates the program for a maximum of 5.75 AMA PRA Category I Credit(s)â„¢. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Disclosure of Commercial Support and the Unlabeled use of a commercial product. No member of the planning committee and no member of the faculty for this event have a financial interest or other relationship with any commercial product.

The Washington School of Psychiatry is an independent non-profit organization. It is not affiliated with the government of the District of Columbia or the government of the United States.

The Washington School of Psychiatry is approved to operate by the Higher Education Licensure Commission of the District of Columbia.


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The Washington School of Psychiatry is an independent non-profit organization. It is not affiliated with the government of the District of Columbia or the government of the United States.


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