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World Views in Conflict: Exploring Implicit Bias Through Large Group Experience

  • Friday, January 29, 2021
  • Saturday, January 30, 2021
  • 2 sessions
  • Friday, January 29, 2021, 10:00 AM 6:30 PM (EST)
  • Saturday, January 30, 2021, 10:00 AM 6:30 PM (EST)
  • Zoom

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World Views in Conflict: Exploring Implicit Bias Through Large Group Experience

Plenary Presenters

Kavita Avula, PsyD & Bradley Lake, MSW


Large Group experience provides a unique opportunity for examining the attitudes, automatic thoughts, and stereotypic beliefs of implicit bias that reside within us. We will explore how the interplay of family history, life circumstance, structural and systemic forces, collective trauma, and a multiplicity of social identities are involved in the genesis and maintenance of social biases. Of particular interest are systems of privilege and the consequences of stigma and oppression. Our aim is to promote an ethos of inclusion and tolerance by cultivating empathy for difference and diverse experience as well as commonalities and shared purpose.

Learning Objectives

Implicit Bias:

  • 1.      List factors that influence the genesis and maintenance of social biases.
  • 2.      Assess the effects of social privilege on the experience of stigma and oppression in marginalized groups.
  • 3.      Explain the relationship between implicit and explicit biases that co-exist within human beings.

Therapist-Centered:

  • 4.      List multiple social identities reflected in oneself.
  • 5.      Describe attitudes, automatic thoughts and stereotypic beliefs that are reflective of one’s own implicit biases.
  • 6.      Discuss examples of social privilege in one’s life, or lack thereof, that influence one’s own implicit biases.

Applications to Group Psychotherapy:

  • 7.      Verbally convey empathy to group members whose social identities and histories I do not share.
  • 8.      Assess socio-cultural differences in group members, beginning in the formative stage and throughout the life of the group. 
  • 9.      Intervene verbally to identify microaggressions that occur throughout the therapy group experience and discuss their impact on group members.

Space is limited for this event.

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